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Blog Reflection – 6 Experience Prototyping – mfer5686

Michele Fernandez

How did physically acting out help to explore ideas?

It was very different to represent the experience we were trying to design as opposed to just imagining it. There were some details and situations that we understood better after acting, that ended up making a big difference in our conclusions.

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Did you refine your ideas and solutions to the problem through bodystorming? In what way?

Yes, definitely. We came up with an isolation device,  that we realized we´d felt bad about using in a social context because others might feel rejected. We had not thought about the social implications of this idea during ideation, and probably wouldn´t have without bodystorming.

What was difficult or challenging about bodystorming?

For me it was difficult to stay in character part of the time. it required some extra concentration to be able to do it. I found it a lot easier to act as observer and take notes from my teammates actions.

Does bodystorming lend itself to certain types of problems?

My group and i agreed that it was very useful to make situations real, but also to encourage playful thinking. It different to be able to observe/perform behavior directly, that makes easier to have empathy with users, because it is easier to remember our related experiences and knowledge. I would say bodystorming is specially useful to design for complex interaction, where some subtle details or situations could be overlooked by designers if they were only to brainstorm.

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Blog Reflection 6: Experience Prototyping – (amol0125)

  • How did physically acting out help to explore ideas?

When individuals imagine solutions for their problems, they will not usually be able to understand all aspects of the problems unless they try to put themselves in a real situation or at least in a semi-real scenario which requires them to act physically and mentally simultaneously.  Not only can physically acting out show off the real issues with relevant details, but also discloses the practical restrictions one encounters through the resolving of the issues.

  • Did you refine your ideas and solutions to the problem through bodystorming? In what way?

Yes of curse, bodystorming made the group members interact with each other practically as well as mentally and it caused them to see the behaviour of other members in semi-real circumstances which was very helpful in improving and refining final resolutions step by step.

In fact, bodystorming can help better brainstorming when designers are trying to acheive their best findings and insights by examining the physical situations.

  • What was difficult or challenging about bodystorming?

First, assigning the roles and their related duties to group members was a bit challenging. Second, time management of consequential events of scenario was another issue while members were acting out. Third, creating a relevant scenario was not as easy as it looked in the beginning, and it found its way so that group was acting different from the first raw scenario.

  • Does bodystorming lend itself to certain types of problems?

Not necessarily, but it depends on the people who are going to act out a role. Shy people usually hesitate to play in front of others. Besides, many people do not know how to play naturally or at least how to play. In bodystorming, actors need to be trained a bit to be able to fulfil the minimum requirements of their roles.

Group Brainstorming:

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Group Bodystorming: (Doctor waiting room)

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Final findings and solutions:

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Blog 6 – LMIL9621

LMIL9621 – Lisa Miller

1)How did physically acting out help to explore ideas?

Physically acting out ideas added the element of ‘play’ to problem solving. It encouraged more eccentric ideas as you’re bouncing ideas off each other. The physical actions created the ability to engage in how the consumer would feel in the situation. Unlike previous exercises where we created the story of the consumer, this allowed us to become the consumer and therefore it allowed the understanding of the emotions, frustrations and motives of them.

2) Did you refine your ideas and solutions to the problem through bodystorming? In what way?

Essentially, bodystorming was not a good tool for refining solutions. The benefit of bodystorming was that it brought a very ‘child-like’ playfulness to the situation, and was great in the initial stage of thinking of the potential problems and solution. The disadvantage was that it lacked the ability to produce practical well thought out ideas. In acting out the ideas all the obvious faults were ruled out but it did not really push more innovative, interesting ideas.

3) What was difficult or challenging about bodystorming?

One of the challenges with bodystorming is having the balance of playfulness and feasibility. For bodystorming to work well, it either needs to be used alongside other methods or continuously be cycled through a loop of identifying the problem, thinking of a solution, and then identifying the issues with the solution. Potentially if there was a person on the outside who continuously question the feasibility of the ideas this might have worked better. The other issue is that it is essentially a group brainstorming exercise. The issue with group brainstorming is that it is easy to move onto a tangent instead of relating back to the main idea. Our problem was sleeping on an airplane. When discussing this with the class, most groups came up with a cacoon-like solution and then developed into tangent off that. Bringing it back to the original issue is often a challenge in this type of exercise.

4) Does bodystorming lend itself to certain types of problems?

Essentially bodystorming can be used in any sort of human centered problem. The more user intensive the problem the more usefully bodystorming would be. More important than the problem itself, would be the stage it would be used in. I think bodystorming is best used in the initial stages before refinement.

blog6

Blog Reflection 6 HALV5836

Blog Relection 6

  • How did physically acting out help to explore ideas? 


While brainstorming, my group and I overlook different situation due to the fact it was more difficult to imagine different situations by being passive rather than “Acting” them.

In specific situations like redefining the sleeping experience in airplanes, it is a great method to pretend to be the user and see what are the difficulties the user might come across.

I believe, in cases where physical space is involved, bodystorming should be included into the idea generation process.

  • Did you refine your ideas and solutions to the problem through bodystorming? In what way? 


Definitely. By brainstorming as a first step, we had some ideas to star off and test them through bodystorming. Some of the ideas were refined or completely put away from the solutions. For instance, by offsetting the seats from the rows, we avoided the discomfort of standing up to let the next seat person sit. But in the end, the capacity of the airplane would be reduced.

  • What was difficult or challenging about bodystorming? 


Trying to find objects to make our set more believable for the actors. One of the key factors to find unseen problems is to act like a prospective user. For that, you need to replicate the scenario as real as you can. With other people from other groups doing the same exercise, it was difficult to immerse in the character.

  • Does bodystorming lend itself to certain types of problems?

I cannot think of any. Probably, finding a solution through bodystorming and testing it into a real scenario and finding out that the problem is still there could be one of the problems. It is important to replicate the gist of the background where the design should take place or be used.

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Blog 6 – Experiencing Prototyping – rsha2256

  1. How did physically acting out help to explore ideas?
    Physically acting ideas helped us to appreciate the situation better, and often gave us information we may have missed otherwise. For example, our group picked ‘sleeping on airlplanes’. One thing that all of had completely missed, and which only came up through bodystorming, is that a person sitting near the aisle gets disturbed twice when a person at the window seat needs to go to the lavatory. During this time, the person at the aisle has to wait and is not able to go back to sleep.Bodystorming also allowed us to stretch the boundaries of the situation. For example, a person who needs to go to the lavatory may not always return to their seats immediately after. He or she may move to a different part of the cabin to chit-chat with friends who may be on the same flight, further prolonging the wait for the person seated near the aisle.
  2. Did you refine your ideas and solutions to the problem through bodystorming? In what way?
    Because we were changing the parameters of the situation, we came up with some solutions we may not have otherwise. For example, we had an idea for helping visually impaired persons get back to their seats using sound to signal when they were approaching their seats. Staggered seat configurations was another idea that emerged from bodystorming.
  3. What was difficult or challenging about bodystorming?
    Bodystorming takes time and requires more in terms of props and arrangements. As an individual, you also need to loosen up and put yourself in the frame of mind of the person you are acting out which could be a challenge.
  4. Does bodystorming lend itself to certain types of problems?
    I think it lends itself extremely well to problems in real-world situations which sees people interacting with one another in a defined space. It may not well as well to areas such as software design, which typically has one person interacting with the product.

Blog Reflection 06 – Experience Prototyping (Bodystorming) – mlai2112

1. How did physically acting out help to explore ideas?
Our topic was sleeping in airplanes. We explored and found out some existing problems that we missed out through physically acting. For example, we did not realise that if the person sitting in window seat need to go/come back from lavatory might disturb the person sitting next him/her. Bodystorming help us to find out the current issues by putting ourselves in a situation and scenario. There are may be some small details that we did not notice until we act it out. By going through this process, we found out more insights to develop a better design.

2. Did you refine your ideas and solutions to the problem through bodystorming? In what way?
Yes. I thought of changing the airplane layout to minimise disturbance. For example, each seat is next to the hallway instead of having four seats in a row. In order words, all seats are come in pair except the window seats. We thought of several ways to improve the situation. Furthermore, by acting out, it helps us to determine which idea is the simplest and the most effective. It is easier to express/convey your idea to the group by showing them in action instead of verbally.

3. What was difficult or challenging about bodystorming?
I found it hard to act out in front of others. I feel embarrass in the beginning since it is my first time doing bodystorming. I get use to it as it goes. There are times that I just don’t know what to do next. It was interesting to see how other party would response to the situation.

4. Does bodystorming lend itself to certain types of problems?
Yes. There are people who are shy and not comfortable to act out in front of others would be problem itself. We need people put themselves in a situation to stimulate ideas.

– Vicky

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